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REFLECTIONS 



Reflections of a new day as we journey to the dawning of discovery 
brings forth the challenges of today. Now is the time for us to stretch out 
and take the wings of knowledge, to spread our horizons for tomorrow may 
be too late. The journey is long; the road is weary and the reward awaits; 
for today is the beginning of a magnificent dream called yesterday's tomor- 
row. 

As we pass through the halls of academia, our reflections on success and 
the assessments of self combine to make our thoughts reality. Reflections of 
responsibility ... the need to be, to do, to have. Reflections of opportunity 
... the chance to express, to learn, to solve. Reflections of ability ... the 
capacity to envision, to change, to grow. Indeed we reflect without as well 
as within. 

In reflecting we project our thoughts, our imaginations. We create our 
own universe -ourselves. The web we weave becomes a self-imposed pris- 
on of assumption and as such we must realize that it is ours to control. 
Unerringly youth beguiles the uninitiated for lack of experience. With 
experience comes opportunity; with opportunity, responsibility; with responsi- 
bility, expectation and with expectation, hope. 

We present this yearbook to you in hopes for tomorrow and in the future 
that the dreams you dream and the reflections of your yesteryears combine 
to make each day a truly memorable experience. 



CHICAGO STATE UNIVERSITY 

95th AT KING DRIVE 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 






Contents: 

Activities, ..p. 4 

Sports,,, p. ZS 
Academics,., p. 43 
Features,,, p, 73 
Administration„.p, 95 
Graduates,,, p. 107 
Campus Life„,p, 139 



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REGISTRATION 




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The department of English and speech pre- 
sented two theatre classics during the 1982- 
83 season. In the fall Professor Sherwood 
Snyder directed ^'Death of a Salesman", the 
tragic story of Willy Loman played by Jessie 
Brown. In the spring Professor James Dresen 
directed the comedy "Harvey" the delightful 
tale of a very tall rabbit and his friend, 
Elwood Dowd, portrayed by Brandon Ar- 
nold. 



Scene from "Death of a Salesman" 



Scene from "Harvey' 






Throughout the school year, in 
concert in the theatre or in the 
gym at a basketball game, music 
students provide every kind of 
musical experience from jazz to 
the classics. 





Outstand 




Outstanding talent was 
showcased in several 
events throughout the aca- 
demic year by Chicago 
State University students. 
The Latin American Stu- 
dents Festival, an Evening 
of Poetry — sponsored by 
the Black Writers Forum, 
and the talent show are 
just some of the most 
notable activities featured 
where a spectacular array 
of talent was immensely 
enjoyed by fellow stu- 
dents, faculty and others. 



Ing Talent 






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Thanksgiving, a time of giving and sharing 
amoung people; a time to give thanks and to 
show appreciation tor all the blessings of the 
past year. 1982 was indeed a time of remem- 
brance and of giving honor. Students, faculty 
and friends remembered these thoughts as 
CSU welcomed Chicago's senior citizens to 
the annual Pre-Thanksgiving Day Dinner. 






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First Annual Multi-class Reunion was an outstanding success. 
Below: Annual Phonathon nets over $30,000. 




Politics At CSV 



1983 has been a 
historical year in politics. 
Successions and changes 
of world-wide conse- 
quence have occurred. 
Here in Chicago with the 
election of Harold 
Washington, the first 
black mayor of the City 
of Chicago, our city re- 
ceived national and 
international attention. 

Another historic first 
occurred on the campus 
of Chicago State 
University — an event 
unprecedented in the 
annals of CSU; the stu- 
dents united together in 
stauch support of the 
cause and helped to 
bring about the historic 
victory. 

We salute Mr. 
Washington and those 
students, staff and 
faculty who supported 
him! 




Above: CSU faculty support Harold Washington at rally. 



Below: Department of Economics and Political Science hosts Panel on Chicago Politics, 





The 1983 homecoming celebration holds 
a unique and significant place in the 
memories of all CSU students, faculty, and 
alumni because for the first time our own 
CSU cougars held the prestigious honor of 
being the number one ranked basketball 
team in the NAIA. Furthermore, not only 
did we win the homecoming game by a 
score of 91-88, but we also proved our 
rightful ownership to the coveted title of 
being number one. The Hawks played a 
spectacular game, but the Cougars came 
to win and did! 



HOMECOMING 




Some of the activities included the fashion 
show where some CSU students put their 
best foot forward with some of the fashions 
of the 80's. The talent show, yet another 
outstanding event, was also featured. Some 
of CSU's most talented students came forth 
and showed fellow students, faculty, and 
others the best talent around. Homecoming 
week was ended by a dance where CSU 
students and others came to have a good 
time and let their hair down. 





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Ping-pong demands concentration, and a dash of "English", of course. 







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Cougars are intense in practice as well as play. 




Dance class warms-up for more serious instruction. 




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First row Coach Barry Shaw, Larando I3rake, Rich Thompson, Matt Peppers, Zeke Rand, Ron Collum, Terry Bradley, Coach Bob Hallberg, Darryl 
Fowler Second row Sonny Sandlin, Dennis Wills, Melvin Buckley, Tanno Herring, Marc Brooks, Greg Lehmann, Sherrod Arnold, Lee Cummings, 
AssI Coach Rick Pryor 



Chicago 


State University \ 




Cougars 




W li Chicago State 


lOH 


Olivet Nazarene 


74 


1 1 17 Illinois State 


6J 


Chicago State 


54 


1 1 il) Chicago State 


42 


Northeastern III 


76 


1.' -1 Chicago State 


57 


North Park 


54 


IJ H Chicago State 


59 


St Francis 


48 


!_' II Chicago State 


83 


Mckendree 


70 


IJ IH Chicago State 


58 


St Xavier 


40 


]J JO Chicago State 


82 


Kentucky Stale 


56 


U 1^> Chicago State 


lOb 


Morehouse 


67 


1 T Chicago Stale 


88 


South Alabama 


7 i 


1 H Iowa State 


bO 


Chicago Slate 


58 


1 \I Chicago State 


106 


Northeastern III 


62 


1 IS Chicago State 


86 


Western III 


71 


1 m Chicago State 


83 


Wis-Parkside 


76 


1 JJ Chicago State 


7! 


Kentucky State 


62 


1 J-4 Chicago State 


7 b 


Central Stale 


b4 


1 JM Chicago State 


4 1 


(^uincy 


88 


I 1 Chicago State 


65 


Wis-Parkside 


b4 


I ') Chicago State 




Central Slate 


bl 


I K Chicago State 


85 


NT 


b5 


J IJ Chicago State 


73 


McKendree 


b'-) 


J M Chicago Stale 


68 


SlU-Edwardsville 


51 


1 Ih (^uincy 


6i 


Chicago Slate 


b2 


J IH Chicago Slate 


88 


St Francis 


"0 


/ Jl Chicago Slate 


84 


St Xavier 


bO 


J JT in 


8) 


(hi.agoSiaU. 


8 1 


J J(. ( hitago Siaic 


1 II) 


Shau 


8 1 


i .' ( hu.iKi) Stale 


S 1 


l.'WIs 


4^ 


NAIA District Tournament \ 


i S Chicago Stale 


77 


St Francis 




i 7 Chicago Slate 


75 


Aurora 


b4 


i 4 Chicago Stale 


84 


Quincy 


"1 


NAM National Tournament 1 


; II. V\esl Virginia 


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( hicago SI,, I.. 






Men's Basketball: 
Having a Ball at the Top! 




Looking to the future . . . 
that's exactly what Chicago 
State University's head Basket- 
ball Coach Bob Hallberg is 
keeping in mind while prepar- 
ing for the upcoming 1982-83 
collegiate basketball season. In 
defining the term ''future" as 
far as the CSU Cougar basket- 
ball team is concerned, many 
factors come into play, such as 
the University's recent 
commitment to working 
towards an NCAA Division I 
status for the entire athletic 
program which will be effective 
as of September 1, 1984. 

The new athletic season, 
therefore, will mark the start of 
a two-year transitional period 
where the CSU Men's Basket- 
ball Team (as well as all other 
CSU athletic programs), under 
Hallberg's guidance will be up- 
grading the caliber of competi- 
tion they will play and also the 
talent of the entire team. 

Coming off a winning 17-13 
1981-82 season mark, the CSU 
Cougars anxiously anticipated 
the 28-game schedule which in- 
cludes NCAA Division I oppo- 
nents from Western Illinois Uni- 
versity, Illinois State University, 
the University of South Ala- 
bama, Iowa State University 
and three-time NCAA Division 
III National Champions from 
North Park College. Last sea- 
son, they seemed to have their 
suitcases perpetually packed as 
they travelled for 18 games 
and stayed home for nine -all 
of which the Cougars won. 

Talentwise, Hallberg is confi- 
dent that they've got what it 
takes to win. "Last year's five 
starters collectively averaged 
12.3 points per game (all ex- 
cept one in double figures) and 
we hope to be able to main- 
tain that type of balanced at- 
tack this year. As in the past, 
we will continue to stress and 
further develop the team 
concept of play," explained 
Hallberg. 




District Coach 

of 

the Year 



Sherrod Arnold 





Coach Bob Hallberg 



NAIA National 
Ail-American 



Winners' 




Cougarettes 

he Chicago State University 
i/omen's basketball season 
iromises to be one of the 
xcitement as well as improve- 
lent for the Cougars. This 
ear's squad will be working to- 
ether as a unit during every 
base of the game. "I'm very 
roud of all the great 
ontnbutions each team member 
as already made," stated 
loach Schefkowitz. ~'We are 
ptimistic about the quality of 
ur basketball team. This year's 
?am possesses the qualities of 
ride, enthusiasm, desire and tai- 
nt," continued Schefkowitz. 
■s far as team personnel is con- 
erned, the Cougars will be hol- 
ered by the return of six vet- 
rans, four of which are starters, 
wading the returning veterans is 
'5 V2" junior Juliana Comprindo. 
graduate of Percy Julian High 
chool, Comprindo claimed 
tost Valuable Player honors for 
iree consecutive seasons during 
er high school career. 




Kneeling -left to right: Darlene Arbram, Yvette Holt, Donna Young, Marilyn Williams, 
Jacqueline Burton, Standing -left to right: Asst. Coach Cindy Krzystofiak, Wanda 
Barnes, Jacqueline Harris, Anita Gilkey, Melissa Bates, Misty Shaver, Juliana Comprindo, 
Head Coach Jan Scheflkowitz. 33 




Wrestling: 
It's a Jungle 
Out There! 



Front row: Brian lohnson. Brad Wartman, Murray Shambee, Bruce lohnson, Jerome Hicks. Back row: Derrick Hardy - 
Coach, Tom Carey, Francis Brantley, Mike Smith, Frank Shepard, David Kotowski, Lionel Keys. Not pictured: Larry 
Moore, Alex Dawson, |uan Vincenty, Aron Meeks. 



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Baseball: 

The Real Swingers! 




Front row: Tim Burns co-capt., Marco Johnson co-capt., Hector Serrano co-capt., Andy Stedt co-capt. Back row: Cal- 
vin Pitchford, John Kramer, Steve )ohnson, Dave Braden, Tom Reynolds, )ohn Johnson, Phil Crawford, Wym Bradley, 
Troy Boyd, Brian Twardosz, |on Jahnke, Ron Adams, Tony Foster, Mike Jones, Jose Martinez, Scott Dee. Coach Kevin 
McCray (not pictured). 



ONLY THE STRONG SURVIVE! 
TENNIS VOLLEYBALL 



According to Chicago State University's head Men's 
Tennis Coach Gary Sailes, this year's Men's Tennis 
team is the strongest tennis squad the University has 
been in 10 years. They will play a very ambitious 
schedule which includes 29 matches, three of them 
against NCAA Division I institutions. They will also par- 
ticipate in both the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic 
Conference (CCAC) and the NAIA District 20 Tourna- 
ments. 

Coach Sailes has had a highly successful recruiting 
year and was fortunate in getting key transfer student 
Mel Phillips from Southern Illinois University- 
Edwardsville where he was a member of the men's 
tennis squad that won the NCAA Division II title four 
times during the last six years. 

The CSU Men's Tennis team has something that 
was previously lacking in past seasons, that is depth. 
"1 predict that we will do well this season. We are 
looking forward to winning our conference CCAC 
tournament in May and one or two places in the 
NAIA Distnct 20 Tournament," stated Coach Sailes. 

This year's tennis squad promises to be even stron- 
ger according to Coach Sailes. He still is keeping his 
eyes peeled for quality players. There are also high 
school hopefuls in the wings who have expressed an 
interest in attending CSU. 



Last year the Cougars accumulated a respectable 16-17- 
1 record amidst an extremely tough and competitive 
schedule. This season they hope to improve their dual 
meet and tournament records while participating in the 
National Association for Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) for 
the first time. 

Highlights of the 1982-83 season includes three tough 
tournaments, namely the University of Wisconsin-Parkside 
Ranger Tournament, and the Moraine Valley Tournament. 
Chicago State hosts its own fourth Annual Cougar 
Invitational with the following teams scheduled to partici- 
pate: College of DuPage, Rosary College, Trinity College, 
North Park College, Moody Bible College and the Illinois 
Institute of Technology. 

As far as team personnel is concerned. Coach Raymond 
and Assistant Coach Duggan are highly optimistic. Among 
the returning veterans are junior Laura Kelly, from Mother 
of Sorrows High School, a strong hitter and middleblocker 
and junior Donna Staisiunas, from Maria High School, a 
fine off-side hitter and good blocker. Sophomore Jane 
Wolf from Mother McAuley High School will head the 6-0 
attack as setter. This highly qualified nucleus will form the 
basis on which Coach Raymond hopes to build a tough 
squad. They should guide the squad through a rough sea- 
son. The CSU Volleyball Cougars are a fairly young squad, 
with only three returning veterans and nine recruits. 



Front row: Darius Woolfolk, Tony Perez, Robert Hernandez, Darryl Hargett. Back row: Mel Phillips, Steve Sleczka, 
Ron Branch, Robert Ledbetter, Gary Sailes -Head Coach. 



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Front row: Laura Kelly, lackie Henry, )ane Wolf, Karen Kozlowski Center row: Debra Williams, Carmelita Harris, 
Phyllis Cephas. Back row: Cindy Krzystotiak- Asst. Coach, lean Duggan-Asst. Coach, Donna Straisiunas, Nancy 
Savino, )ulie Comprindo, Lisa Raymond — Head Coach. Not pictured: Donna Young — Manager, Lou Murray — Trainer. 



Track/Golf: 
It's Not All 
Fun and Games 




L-R; Coach Don Scherrer, Lyie Montgomery, George Daly, )oe Stasiunias. 




Keep 

Getting 

Better! 



L-R; )an Schefkowitz- Women's Basketball and Softball Coach, Juliana Comprindo- top 
scorer on the basketball team and member of the volleyball and Softball teams Lisa 
Raymond - Assistant Director of Women's Sports and Volleyball Coach, Laura Kelly - 
captain of volleyball team and member of softball team. 



CSV 

Women 

In 

Sports 




L-R: Front row: Mary Dalla Costa, Yvette Wilson, Bridget Myers, Donna Young, 
Carmelita Harris, Patricia Brookins, Yasmina Vaval Back row: Asst. Coach Cindy 
Krzystofiak, Shirley lohnson, Deneen Fears, Anita Gilkey, Melissa Bates, Darine Pugh, Lau- 
ra Kelly, Rochelle Lathan, Head Coach )an Schefkowitz. 



sports 

Candids! 




Let Us Entertain You! 




Pom-Pon 



Left to Right: Front Row: lenna Khaalog, Ericka Wilson, Veronica Outrey, 

Margaret Lee; Back Row: Lawanda Dean, Theresa Shedrick, Sheilah 

Trammer, Monica Tutson, Caria Early, Carmin Patterson, Leah Adams, 
Suzette McNeal, Vera Clinton. 



Cheer- 
leaders 




Left to Right: Belinda Owens, Carmencita Lewis, Yvette Scott, Lorraine Sims, Antoinette 
Thomas, Tern Smith, Paula lohnson, Tamara Williams, Angle Mitchell, Tamara Bell. 







^^-'-'^'^^ 




CHICAGO 
UNIVE 

College of 



College of Nursing 



College of Business and Administration 





COLL 



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STATE 
RSITY 



Arts and Sciences 





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EGES 



College of Education 



College of Allied Health 




COLLEGE 

OF 

EDUCATION 




DEAN 
Barbara Kardas 



CHAIRPERSONS: 

Dept of Business Education, Brasco Coleman 

Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction, Clarence Olsen 

Dept. of Early Childhood and Elementary Education, 

Vaso K. Papadopulos 

Dept. of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, 

Phyllis Swanson 

Dept. of Home Economics, Rhea V. Shields 

Dept. of Library Science and Communications Media, 

Marian Taylor 

Dept. of Occupational Education, Edmund Reinhart 

Dept. of Reading, Genevieve Lopardo 

Dept of Special Education, Patricia A Atherton 





Patricia Atherton 
Special Education 



Dr. Genevieve Lopardo 
Reading Department 





Clarence Olsen 

Department of Curriculum riod Instruc- 
tion 




Rhea Shields 

Department of Home Economics 





Vaso Papadopulos 

Department of Early Childhood and 

Elementary Education 




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Edward Reinhart 

Department ot Occupational Education 




Phyllis Swanson 

Department of Health, Physical Education 

and Recreation 




Marion Taylor 

Department of Library Science and Com- 
munications Media 



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COLLEGES 

OF 

ARTS AND SCIENCES 




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Milton Cordon 
DEAN 



Department Chairpersons 

Mary Ann Abella, Department of Art 

Alice Barter, Department of English and Speech 

Robert Bernhardt, Department of Mathematics 

Richard Bloss, Department of Economics and Political Science 

Ann Bond, Department of Biological Sciences 

Irving Cutler, Department of Geography 

leanne Daly, Department of Psychology 

Bryant Feather, Department of Corrections and Criminal justice 

Walter Kelly, Department of History 

Hector Hernandez-Nieto, Department of Modern Languages 

Warren Roth, (department ot Sociology, Anthropology, and 

Philosophy 

Leonard Simutis, Department of Music 

Richard Treptow, Department ot Physical Sciences 




Mary Ann Abella 
Department of Art 



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Alice Barter 

Department of English and Speech 




Robert Bernhardt 
Department of Mathematics 





Richard Bloss 

Department of Economics and Political 

Science 




Ann Bond 

Department of Biological Sciences 



Irving Cutler 

Department of Geography 




Above: Professor Stolarz tries to "bring home" 
the statistics methodology. Top Right: Professor 
Campos of the Department of Corrections and 
Criminal Justice. Bottom Right: Professor Kang 
presides over an economics class. 




The prevalent use of computers in our society has spawned 
the need of computer specialists to handle the many facets of 
computer operations. Above, students prepare to enter this 
new frontier. 






leanne Daly 

Department of Psychology 




Bryant Feather 

Department of Corrections and Criminal 

Justice 




Walter Kelly 
Department of History 




Hector Hernandez-Nieto 
Department of Modern Languages 




Warren Roth 

Department of Sociology, Anthropology 

and Philosophy 




Leonard Simutis 
Department of Music 






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COLLEGE 

OF 

BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION 




Willidin Malone 
Dean 



Clinton Bristow, Chairperson 
Department of Management, 
Marketing and Information Systems 




Raj Gupta, Chairperson 
Department of Accounting 
Finance 




rw 







Cynthia Bell, a senior finance major, was awarded a schol- 
arship by Leon Jackson, chairman of the Minority Business 
Subcouncil of the Chicago Regional Purchasing Council. Also 
pictured is Dean Malone. 




COLLEGE OF NURSING 






Anne Davis 
Acting Dean 






Vivienne Dawkins 
Acting Chairperson 




College of Nursing 
Has Stamp of Approval 




In 1981 the College of 
Nursing received initial 
accreditation from the Na- 
tional League for Nursing. 
The decision to grant 
accreditation was made by 
the Board of Review of the 
Division of Baccalaureate and 
Higher Degree Programs of 
the league. This achievement 
was due to the leadership, 
quality of the faculty and the 
nursing program. 




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Cornelio Obordo, Asst. Professor 




Sandra Underwood, Asst^ Professor 



Modestine Ishmon, Asst- Professor 



College 

Of 

Allied Health 




Anderson Ward 



17 



This year the College of Allied Health added a 
new program. Occupational Therapy, to their of- 
ferings. The addition of the Occupational Therapy 
curriculum has addressed the need of developing 
professionals to enter this field. 

Program Directors: 

Roland Dale — Medical Records Administration 

Artice Harmon — Occupational Therapy 

Mary Price-Moisand — Dietetics 

Phyllis Thompson — Radiation Therapy Technology 





The College of Allied Health offers four up- 
per-division programs leading to the Bachelor 
of Science degree. These programs are Dietet- 
ics, Medical Record Administration, Occupa- 
tional Therapy and Radiation Therapy 
Technology. 





Mm" 



Roland Dale 

Director, Medical Re- 
cords Administration 



Artice Harmon 
Director, Occupational 
Therapy 




Mary Price-Moisand 
Director, Dietetics 




Phyllis Thompson 

Director, Radiation Therapy 

Technology 





MRA student, Vanda Burnley, receives a scholarship 

Below: Dunng the Allied Health Open House, students participated in the Occupational Therapy Apparatus 
Quiz. 





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S tudent 
Cr overnment 
A ssociation 

Members: 

Shirley Daugherty 
Sydney Dorsey 
Diane Gilbert 
Darryl Humphries 
Charles Stewart 
Eric Tabb 
Deborra Roller 
Lori Crawford 
Yvette Bascomb 




L-R; Thomas Buckner, Darrell Coleman, lennifer Layne^ 



Officers: 



President; Darrell Coleman 

V.P. Student services: Jennifer Layne 

V.P. Educational Standards: Joaquin Barry 



SGA President addresses CStJ students during pep rally. 





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Left to right Back Row-Debra Singleton, Frank Campbell, lohn Smith, presi- 
dent. Sterling Sims. Second Row -Michael Kardas, jack Thayer, Barbara Miller, 
President Ayers, Robert Weitz art club advisor. First Row: Pamela Butler, Mi- 
chelle Stutts, (unidentified student). 



B 




Tempo Staff: Left to right: Back Row: Curtis Green, sports editor; Donda West, 
faculty advisor; Douglas Allen, sportswriter, Debora Praggs, managing editor; 
Dennis Jackson, editor Front Row: Marcellus Leonard, business manager; 
Zandra Tyler, features editor. Photo by Larry Wilson, Tempo staff photogra- 
pher. 



SIGMA GAMMA RHO 







Left to Right: Annette Britt, Twylia Smiley, Stephanie Chapman, Linniel Ellzey, 
Cozetta Long. 



ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA 




Left to Right: Seated: Cecelia Moore, Serita Evans, Cerelous Douglas, 
Yvette House, Tonia Sadler. Standing: Jacquelyn Williams, Patricia Moore, 
Valencia Smith, Denita Hunter, Crystal Clay, Carolyn Hankins, Paulette 
Dukes, Venus Cole, Sherrie Hersey. 



ALPHA PHI ALPHA 




Left to Right: Michael Owens, Carlos McCullough, David W. Holliday, 
Marcel D. Barnett, Vance Bonner, Michael Dickerson, Darren Bolden. 



OMEGA PSI PHI 




Lett to Right: Kirkland Crossley, William Smith, Edgar Lucas, Kenneth 
Cobbs, Rodney Bates, )effery Smith, Neander Rowlett. 



BIOLOGY CLUB 



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Professor lack Fooden, advisor, Vonda Gaines, secretary, Anthony Davis, 
Angela Craig, Dwayne Dixon, president, Lisa Boyd. 



CHEMISTRY 
CLUB 



Top down, L-R: Sharon White, 
Dr Robert Hollins, advisor, Ar- 
thur Mardis, Regina Cason, 
Debbie Weathersby, Levon 
Edwards, treasurer, Renee Poe, 
vice-president, Charles Downs, 
Rita Ware, president, Mark 
Ricks. 





Left to Right: Standing: Mark Thorton, Angie Craig, Veranda Willis, Detrice lohnson, Pethsheba Bullock. 
Seated: Arthur Mardis, Evelene Steward, treasurer, Bryan Latham, president, Connie Umbles Not pic- 
tured: Ceri Bernard, secretary, Alix Solomon, vice president, Vonda Gaines, Yvette Battle, Shirolyn Ector, 
Rita Ware, Deatra Fleming, Ava Whitfield, Alma Smith, Bernadine White, Nolan Lathrop, Paula Gray, Za- 
dok Dean III, Rebecca Karr, Ron Berry Mark Boyd, Donald Rogers, Deborah )ones. 



B 
S 
P 
A 




Back Row: Left to Right - Robert Davis, Rudolph Hite, Stephany Pruitt, president, Haven Fisher. Mane 
Carter, secretary. Seated: Esther lenkins, co-advisor, Betty Stroud, Georgia Myrick, corresponding secre- 
tary, Bobbie M. Anthony-Perez co-advisor (B. SPA. — Black Students Psychological Association). 



FENCING CLUB 




Robert Brice and Hazel Smith 

Not Pictured: Renard Banks, Lyie Ferguson, 

and Bernard Shaw 



ROTC 




Left to Right: Top Row; Jeffrey Thompson, Jerry Wiley, 
Steven Kidd, Michael Tennyson. Middle Row: Jason 
Wims, Debra ). Williams Bottom Row: David V. Lozano, 
Paula Johnson, 



DIETETICS CLUB 




MINORITY RESEARCH BIOMEDICAL SUPPORT 
PROGRAM 




Alex Rakowsk 



Counseling 
Center 
K-210 




Rena Krizmis 



Rosalind Morgan 



The CSU Counseling Center is a free service 
which provides professional counseling for group 
and private matters. The center offers workshops 
and various programs to help CSU students 
develop good study and test habits, effective 
management of stress and time, and cope with 
the demands of daily life in our society. 

CSU counselors have had extensive training in 
the helping professions and are able to assist stu- 
dents in handling the normal experiences of 
tension, frustration, anger, fear and joy that are 
part of all our lives. Involvement is voluntary, free 
and available to all members of the University 
community. Privacy and confidentiality are 
maintained. 



Career Planning 
and Placement 

K-200 




Dr. Rena Krizmis, Acting Supervisor of Counseling Cen- 
ter, talks to student 



Career Planning and Placement is concerned 
with assisting all students and alumni in 
investigating career opportunities, formulating 
career goals which match their individual inter 
ests, abilities and field of study, and 
developing placement credentials. The office 
hosts recruiters from various corporations, 
government agencies, school districts and 
graduate and professional schools who come 
on campus regularly to interview students. 
The office is a key resource for students 
seeking permanent fulltime employment. 




Olive Blair-Waugh 
Supervisor 



Vicki Garner 

Graduate Placement Officer 





Allied Health Honors Ceremony 



c4 WARDS/ 
<DEDICATlOSS 



Day Care Center Dedicates 
Playground Fence 



Karen Rochelle Echols 

Radiology student wins award for 

best scientific paper 








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Oscar Wilde, political and social activist, 
visits CSU campus to relate his plight. 



• •• 



OF 

HONORABLE 
MENTION 

Below: Congressman Harold Washington visits CSU during Mayoral 
Campaign. 




Senator Adiai Stevenson visits CSU during gubernatorial 
race. 



Below: Mr. T and Ms. Mariann Aalda visit 
the CSU summer sports program. 





Black Writers Forum present an evening of poetry, music, and dance. 
Father Clements encourages CSU students. 




Hiddekel hair design and fashion show. 




CICELY 



Cicely Tyson, one of the most 
respected and honored talents 
in American film and theatre, 
visited Chicago State in late Feb- 
ruary. Her appearance was part 
of the month's activities saluting 
Black history and also was one 
of the offerings of the Universi- 
ty's Cultural Celebration Series 
for 1983 Tyson commented on 
her career and the challenges 
she had to meet as a Black 
actress and she responded to 
questions from an overflow au- 
dience in the Breakey Theatre. 






Learning 



Chicago State University sponsors a 
variety of activities and programs for local 
elementary and high school students. 
Among the various programs offered is the 
CSU Summer Sports Program, Model Unit- 
ed Nations and Project Challenge which is 
a cooperative program between CSU and 
Carver High School. Project Challenge is 
designed to provide academically motivat- 
ed students access to college level instruc- 
tion and learning resources. The sponsors 
are Carol Gering (top left) and Paula Mur- 
phy (bottom left). 





Enrichment 






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dilways there 
when you 
need them 








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Associate Provost and Academic V.P. 
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Development Patrick Leonard 

William W. Sutton 



UNIVERSITY 
ADMINISTRATION 





Office of Administrative 
Affairs, V.P. 
Paul Brinkman 



Acting Associate V.P. for Administrative Affairs 
Robert Hauwiller 



Office of Planning and Budget 
Wayne Rath 






Assistant to the President/Attirmative Action Officer 
Renee F, Williams 




Assistant to the Provost and V P. for Academic 

Affairs 

Marion Wilson-Comer 



Dean, Office of Admissions and Records 
Contract Administrator 
Walter Heinzel 





Board of Governors Degree Program/ICP Director 
Robert Price 



CSU Foundation & University Giving Executive Direc- 
tor 
Stanley |. McConner 





University Without Walls Director 
Lorenzo Paredes 





Office of Student Support Services 


Office of the Registrar 


Office of Academic Evaluation 


Director 


lames |. Hruska 


Advisement 


Azel Carter 




Specialist 
Robert P. Simutis 





Office of Alumni Affairs 

Specialist 

Rosemary D. Martin 



Office of Student Affairs & Devel- 
opment 

Special Assistant to the Provost 
Susan M. Martindale 



Office of Business Operations 

Director 

Geraldine Brooks 





Office of Continuing Education 
& Extension Services, Director 
Patnck L. Stanton 




Physical Plant Services Director 
Ronald M. Leahy 



Graduate Division Studies & 
Continuing Education, Dean 
Richard Prince 





Acting Director, University Rela- 
tions 
Mary Reaves 




Director of Personnel Services 
C. Chris Keely 



Chief of Campus Police 
Harry Anderson 





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CSV 

COMMENCEMENT 

1983 




the moment has finally come. 




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Dr. Ruth Love 



Pres. George Ayers 








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Ruth Love Speaks Out 



Dr. Ruth B. Love, general superintendent of the Chicago public schools, de- 
livered the lanuary commencement address to CSU graduates during the 307th 
commencement ceremonies. 

In a challenge to Chicagoans to help public school children. Dr. Love an- 
nounced the launching of the Chicago Education Corps, the system's 
comprehensive volunteer program. 

"Anyone who has a desire to voluntarily contribute to the exciting task of 
renewing public education in our city will be enlisted," said Dr. Love. 

Ruth Love, a native of California, was appointed to the position of general 
superintendent of the Chicago schools in 1981, after serving as superintendent 
of the Oakland Unified School District in California for six years. 

During her address. Dr. Love stressed to the graduates the importance of 
backing public education, saying that America continues to be a strong nation 
because of it and not in spite of it. 

"It was our system of public education that allowed us to reach unimagined 
heights as an industrial giant, made us a leader in space technology, and gives 
us the impetus and know-how required to compete in the complex communi- 
cations and computer revolutions," she said. 

Dr. Love appealed to the graduates to become involved in the new volun- 
teer program and use their degrees to "uplift the spirits and physical conditions 
of all humankind." 



MEMORIES. . . 



CHlCAQo 
. STATE 

UNIVERSITY 



COUGARS NO 
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CENTRAL 
ISATURDAY 



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Ruth Anderson 




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Emile Andre 




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Athanasius L. Akpan 




Sharon Anderson 




Bernard Annanze 




Tanza Anderson 




120 Bayo Francis Ashana 



Rhonda Bachus 



Vanessa Barclay 




)ohn Boachie-Ansah 



Sandra Bolton 



leannie Bradshaw '21 





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Elaine Brooks 



Shirley Brooks 




Lloyd Brown 




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Leslie Anne Burton 






Dorlhea Biirrt 




122 Robert Butler 



Sharon Butler 



Carol Carson-Warner 




Ruth Clayton 



Beulah Coleman 



ly 



Eleanor Collins 




Susan Copeland 




Lydia Davenport 





Regina Davis 





Michelle Darang 




Shirley Day 



Robert I Dembowski 



Henry Dill 




Linniel Ellzey 



Pamela Epps 



Ruthie Epting 125 



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Michael Ewuoso 




Kathleen Flournov 



Lydia Fort 





Haven Fisher 




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Shelton Flowers 





Kerry Fitch 




Thurman Foreman 




Romley Geary 




126 Lharita Graham 



Ernestine Green 



Gayla Green 







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Ezeikpe Ikoro 



Samantha Ingram 



Louis lackson 





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William lackson 



Pamela lames 




loyce lefterson 



Grace iohns 






'28 Donna lohnson 



Gloria lohnson 



Lemmie lohnson 





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Sandra |ones 




Ruth lordan 



Wayne D^ Kemp 



Mary Knoebel 129 




lohn Knowlton 



Clara Lacey 



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William Latimore 





Janice Lawrence 



Robert Ledbetter 





Emmitt Lewis 




130 Loretta Love 



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Robert Mansell 




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Gail Long 




Dorothea Manuel 




Sheila McKinnon 



Leslie Meggs 



Lorraine Meyers '3' 





Robyn Michalski 



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Gary Michel 



Lynetta Miller 






Forrestine Mills 



Annie R Milner 



Emma |. Mitchell 






Dolores Morris 


Barry Mosley 


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132 Carrie R. Newsom 



Patricia Newson 



lunene Norman 





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Uwaoma F. Onwunmelu 




Larry Parker 



Christopher B, Pate 



Gilbert Perry '33 




Gladys Ray 




Karlen Robinson 



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Patricia Riley 




Sam Robinson 




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Wanda Pitts 


Cermaine Prince 


Olaide Quadri 




Barbara Robinson 




134 Sherry Rogers 



Clara Selmon 



Karen Shambee 




Carolyn Spencer 



Karen Stevenson 



Queen Stewart '^^ 




Adrian Tucker 





Kuburat Sulaiman 




Glenda Thornton 




Christopher Uboh 




Xiangcheng Tang 




Claudette Towers 



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'34 Ladell Walker 



Patsy Walker 



Darren Washington 




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Stanley T^ White 



Cayle Wilkins 



Clyde Williams i37 




138 Tanya Wright 



Rose Younkins 







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YOU 
OUfiUTA 

BE 
IN 

PICTURES.. 




DON'T FORSET TOUR 
YEARBOOK STAFF 



Reflections 
Staff: 

Ulysses Ruff editor-in-chief 

Wayne Kemp nnanaging editor 

Mark Thomas copy editor ) 

Donna Randolph secretary 

Cenice Wedgeworth staff 

Edgar Lucas staff 

Arilla Woods staff 




Ulysses Ruff, editor-in-chief 



YEARBOOKS IMPROVE WITH 

AGE 



Mark Thomas, copy editor 





Ulysses Ruff 



Another year has come and gone, and yet the memory lingers on as 
experience often does. Nothing can take the place of a memory, since 
memory is a part of experience and experience is always irreplacable, al- 
beit, not always profound. My experience during this past year has been 
to serve, enhance and develop an essential part of this university's heri- 
tage-its yearbook. This book will, I hope, become something of special 
value in the years to come for someone. A yearbook should be more 
than just a record of the previous year. The end of 1982 and the first 
portion of 1983 has been a pivotal period in my life because of spiritual, 
material and personal developments. Consequently it is my hope that 
this yearbook will somehow hold the same amount of significance for all 
of its readers since together we have overcome so many burdens, ob- 
stacles and adversities. 

In closing, I am always pleased to identify just some of the individuals 
who have helped shape, direct and otherwise influence my efforts in 
this achievement. First and foremost, thanks be to God who makes all 
things possible, then to my wife who graciousness inspires me to greater 
heights. I am also grateful to Mr. Robert Hauwiller for his support and 
guidance. Last, but not least, I am indebted to my first mentor and very 
good friend, Mr. Ulysses Chambers and to all those who helped in so 
many ways to bring this book to completion through their support and 
hard work -namely President George Ayers, Provost William Sutton, 
Dean Barbara Henley, Terri Gibbs, Marcia Best, Gail Cannon, the 
yearbook staff and so many others. I thank all of you for your support 
and encouragement. 

Ulysses Ruff 
Editor 



May 7, 1983 



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-i-r- 



Have A Dream": A Sculpture By Abbott Pattison. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



As always, it is almost impossible to acknowledge all the individuals who 
have put their time and effort into making a product such as this one a 
success. Nevertheless we would like to thank everyone who contributed to 
this project and make mention of just a few who helped bring it to pass. 

Photography Credits: Robert Hauwiller, Sterling Simms, Debris Harris, Curtis 
Jeffries, Marcellus Leonard, Donell Montgomery, Larry 
Wilson 

Other Credits: Marcia Best, Terri Cibbs, Donna Murphy 

We would like to thank everyone for their support and encouragement of 
the Chicago State University yearbook. 

We would also like to mention several individuals whose assistance in reviv- 
ing the yearbook last year helped make it a reality: Eugene Neat, Calvin Har- 
ris, Curtis Jeffries, Sterling Simms for their photography, and Charles Sajna, 
Cynthia Lake and Diane Gilbert for their office support and assistance. 



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